International Mobility Programs and Organizations

Horizon 2020 is the biggest EU Research and Innovation programme ever with nearly €80 billion of funding available over 7 years (2014 to 2020) – in addition to the private investment that this money will attract. It promises more breakthroughs, discoveries and world-firsts by taking great ideas from the lab to the market.

Horizon 2020 is the financial instrument implementing the Innovation Union, a Europe 2020 flagship initiative aimed at securing Europe's global competitiveness.

Seen as a means to drive economic growth and create jobs, Horizon 2020 has the political backing of Europe’s leaders and the Members of the European Parliament. They agreed that research is an investment in our future and so put it at the heart of the EU’s blueprint for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth and jobs.

By coupling research and innovation, Horizon 2020 is helping to achieve this with its emphasis on excellent science, industrial leadership and tackling societal challenges. The goal is to ensure Europe produces world-class science, removes barriers to innovation and makes it easier for the public and private sectors to work together in delivering innovation.

Horizon 2020 is open to everyone, with a simple structure that reduces red tape and time so participants can focus on what is really important. This approach makes sure new projects get off the ground quickly – and achieve results faster.

The EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation will be complemented by further measures to complete and further develop the European Research Area. These measures will aim at breaking down barriers to create a genuine single market for knowledge, research and innovation.

 

The Erasmus Programme is an EU exchange student programme that has been in existence since the late 1980™s. Its purpose is to provide foreign exchange options for students from within the European Union and it involves many of the best universities and seats of learning on the continent.

How does the Erasmas Program work?

The programme is aimed at cross-border cooperation between states to aid the growth of international studying, and with over 4000 students involved in the programme at any one time it offers an excellent chance of experience abroad.

How long can students go abroad?

Students can go abroad for 3 to 12 months (including a complementary traineeship period, if planned). The same student may receive grants for studying or being trained abroad totaling up to 12 months maximum per each cycle of study:

  • During the first study cycle (Bachelor or equivalent) including the short-cycle (EQF levels 5 and 6)
  • During the second study cycle (Master or equivalent  EQF level 7) and
  • During the third cycle as doctoral candidate (Doctoral level or EQF level 8)

The duration of a traineeship by recent graduates counts towards the 12 months maximum of the cycle during which they apply for the traineeship.

How long can students go abroad?

Students must be registered in a higher education institution and enrolled in studies leading to a recognized degree or other recognized tertiary level qualification (up to and including the level of doctorate).

The mobility is carried out in the framework of prior orienteer-institutional agreements between the sending and receiving institutions, both of which must be holders of the Erasmus Charter for Higher Education (if located in a Programme country).

 

GFZ Potsdam

The GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences is the national research centre for Earth sciences. Research at the GFZ focuses on the geosphere within the highly complex System Earth with its further subsystems, its interacting sub cycles, and its wide network of cause-and-effect chains. This we do in a close interdisciplinary collaboration with the related scientific disciplines physics, mathematics, chemistry, and biology as well as with the engineering sciences disciplines of rock mechanics, engineering hydrology and seismology.

 

DFG, German Research Foundation

The DFG is the self-governing organization for science and research in Germany. It serves all branches of science and the humanities. In organizational terms, the DFG is an association under private law. Its membership consists of German research universities, non-university research institutions, scientific associations and the Academies of Science and the Humanities.

The DFG receives the large majority of its funds from the federal government and the states, which are represented in all grants committees. At the same time, the voting system and procedural regulations guarantee science-driven decisions.

 

 

German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD)

The DAAD supports over 100,000 German and international student’s und researchers around the globe each year – making it the world’s largest funding organization of its kind. We also promote internationalization efforts at German universities, help developing countries build their own systems of higher education, and support German Studies and German language programs abroad. Our Artists-in-Berlin Program is one of the most renowned international scholarship programs for artists.